Wednesday, November 30, 2016

#greenhouse whiteflies captured

Eradicating whiteflies in a greenhouse is no easy task.

This year we are experimenting with different crops.

Here is an image taken from a pepper leaf with our digital microscope.


These whitefly nymphs are a sign that the greenhouse still has a pest problem.
It seems that we are in need of tighter standards to deal with this.

According to Cropking.com

"Whitefly adults usually congregate at the top of plants. They lay their eggs on the bottom side of the upper plant leaves. The eggs hatch and go through three larval stages while on the bottom of the leaves. The last two larval stages settle down in one location and suck the juices from the leaf cells. This is followed by a pupal stage from which the new adult whitefly emerges. During the time this temperature dependent, 21 plus day process occurs, the plant continues to grow. Later stages of the life cycle are found lower on vertically growing plants."

greenhouses-keeping-bugs-out

Friday, May 20, 2016

Beekeepers

JRHS teacher JF Pepin shows student and staff what to look out for in the JRHS beehive.  The drone,which is larger than the worker bees, is spotted and there is only one queen bee. Both good signs.